December 3, 2016

Dollars and Sense: Raising Financially Fit Kids

Dollars and Sense: Raising Financially Fit Kids
By Kerrie McLoughlin
695 words

Please contact me at mommykerrie@yahoo.com if you'd like to see this piece in full to consider purchasing it for your parenting magazine, either online or in print!

When I was a kid I thought that just because there were checks in my parents’ checkbook, there was plenty of money in the bank. How many kids these days think whipping out a credit card is the way to pay for items – any items – no matter the cost? I don’t want my own kids to be financial freaks, fiscal failures, money misfits. As parents, we have a special opportunity to teach our kids about money … and how they can handle it responsibly so they stay out of debt down the line and know how to save for their future needs and wants.

Saving money. The elementary-age crowd is eager to soak up information about money, as they are tiny consumers. Start with a simple piggy bank for very young kids and teach about saving money in the piggy bank until they have saved enough money to buy something special. For preschoolers, this may be a small toy. For older kids, they may keep their saved money in a wallet and eventually spend it on something like a nice doll outfit, a LEGO set or a Nerf gun.


Kerrie McLoughlin is the homeschooling mom of five financially savvy kids and shares their journey at FrugaliciousFamilyFun.com.

How Martial Arts Combats Bullying

How Martial Arts Combats Bullying
By Kerrie McLoughlin
736 words

Please contact me at mommykerrie@yahoo.com if you'd like to see this piece in full to consider purchasing it for your parenting magazine, either online or in print!

According to StopBullying.gov, a study found that approximately 49% of kids in 4th through 12th grade said they had been bullied at least one time in the previous month. Bullying can lead to low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, poor performance in school and, in some extreme cases, even suicide.

Where is bullying happening? It’s happening most often at school, including at recess and on the school bus, but school isn’t the only place. It also occurs where kids are gathering in large groups, like at amusement parks, block parties, campgrounds and swimming pools. And of course we can’t forget about cyberbullying, which includes using cell phones and computers as ways to bully with words and spread untrue words and embarrassing photos.

So what can we, as parents, do about this widespread problem? Well, it turns out martial arts is a great place to start. Of course, martial arts can’t necessarily tackle the cyberbullying issue, but it can give our kids the self-confidence they need to handle people who are not treating them well in a specific situation.

Kerrie McLoughlin is the homeschooling mom of 5, author of several ebooks on Amazon.com and blogger at TheKerrieShow.com.

Kerrie McLoughlin's Parenting Article Reprint List

Please click on the link for each article you are interested in, and it will take you to the word count and the first couple of paragraphs, as well as information on purchasing a reprint in full.

JANUARY
10 Tips to Conquer Kid Clutter (in the New Year)

Dollars and Sense: Raising Financially Fit Kids in the New Year

Go Green in the New Year (and Save Money!)

National Blood Donor Month: Teach Your Kids the Importance of Blood Donation

CAMP
9 Great Benefits of Sending Teens to Camp

EVERGREEN
10 Tips to Conquer Kid Clutter

Dollars and Sense: Raising Financially Fit Kids

OCTOBER
Bullying Prevention Month: How Martial Arts Combats Bullying

TEEN
9 Great Benefits of Sending Teens to Camp




10 Tips to Conquer Kid Clutter in the New Year

10 Tips to Conquer Kid Clutter
By Kerrie McLoughlin
843 words

Please contact me at mommykerrie@yahoo.com if you'd like to see this piece in full to consider purchasing it for your parenting magazine, either online or in print!

I get exhausted just thinking about how much clutter kids are born with: clothes, shoes, diapers, wipes, bottles, toys, stuffed animals, paperwork and on and on. And it only gets worse as they grow up and start to participate in activities outside the home (think ballet shoes, softball equipment, Scout projects, homework papers and such). Sure, you can tell your kid to clean his room, but chances are he has too much and won’t even know where to start. Why not give a few of these tips a try to help your household recover from clutter?

1.      Start by overhauling what your kids already have for about an hour a day so you don’t get overwhelmed (toys, stuffed animals, shoes, clothes, books, videos). Separate items into two or three piles or bags: throw away, give away (or sell at a consignment store or in a garage sale), and (if applicable) save for a future kid. Then group like items (e.g., shoes, leotards, sports equipment) so you can quickly figure out what you are missing or have too much of. A friend of mine with 4 boys says, “I found that my kids’ dressers were overflowing with clothes, much of it never worn. I went through them and … only kept a few pairs of shorts and pants and their 5 favorite shirts. It has made it much easier for them to get dressed in the morning because without all the clothes they weren’t wearing packed in there, they can choose their outfits quickly.”
2.      Notify family and friends that you are trying to reduce clutter. Grandma would probably be thrilled to get the kids a membership to the local zoo, while several people could pool money to pay for quite a few of your daughter’s ballet lessons. This is also a great way to teach your kids that birthdays and the December holidays are not just about what your kid can get out of the whole deal.

Kerrie McLoughlin is the homeschooling mom of 5 and you can catch up with her at TheKerrieShow.com.


Go Green in the New Year (and Save Money!)

Go Green in the New Year (and Save Money!)
By Kerrie McLoughlin
578 words

Please contact me at mommykerrie@yahoo.com if you'd like to see this piece in full to consider purchasing it for your parenting magazine, either online or in print!

Going green isn’t always easy, but if you choose even just one area of your life to change, your household will save money while also saving the planet. Every little bit helps when you’re going green! It is important, though, to realize that you don’t have to go all-out when you’re just starting. For instance, I used cloth diapers exclusively for five years before I switched to using disposables at night, and I’ve always used disposables when on vacation. Do I feel guilty about not using cloth diapers every day of my kids’ lives? Heck, no! Going green can be a lot of fun … and think of the lessons you’re teaching the next generation! Below are five ways you can start going green in the new year.

Clothing. If your first thought is to head to the mall when it’s time for clothes or shoes, reprogram your thinking! Thrift stores, consignment stores and garage sales are great places to find a whole new (recycled!) wardrobe. As far as getting rid of clothing you no longer want, the Natural Resources Defense Council says that “the average American now discards 68 pounds of clothing a year, wasting energy, water and landfill space.” If your clothing is not in good enough shape to resell, swap or donate, just Google “[your city] textile recycling”. I’m personally setting aside some worn-out, outgrown kid clothing so I can make a crazy quilt someday.

Kerrie McLoughlin learned how to be green from her mom way back in the 1970s. Check her out at TheKerrieShow.com.

Teach Your Kids the Importance of Blood Donation

Teach Your Kids the Importance of Blood Donation
By Kerrie McLoughlin
539 words

Please contact me at mommykerrie@yahoo.com if you'd like to see this piece in full to consider purchasing it for your parenting magazine, either online or in print!

There are countless stories told by people who have been helped by a blood donor they will never meet. Many of these stories include lives being saved by a one-time blood transfusion during childbirth, surgery, an accident or for so many other reasons. Other stories include people who needed regular blood transfusions, including pediatric cancer patients who would not be alive today without this amazing gift of blood. According to NCH Healthcare System in Naples, “It is estimated that nine out of ten people who live to age 70 will require a blood transfusion.”

According to the American Red Cross, just one pint of blood can save up to three lives. January is National Blood Donor month and the perfect time to start thinking about giving blood and/or plasma on a regular basis. Starting when my kids were young, my husband and I would take them to our local blood donation center so they could see their dad giving blood. Since then, they have been eager to hit the required blood donor age and are excited at the idea of helping to save lives. Why not take your child with you to see the blood donation process so you can get him used to the idea and take the mystery out of it?

Kerrie McLoughlin blogs at TheKerrieShow.com and is married to a man who donates his O negative blood and platelets on a regular basis.

Sources:


9 Great Benefits of Teens Attending Camp

9 Great Benefits of Teens Attending Camp
By Kerrie McLoughlin
935 words

Please contact me at mommykerrie@yahoo.com if you'd like to see this piece in full to consider purchasing it for your parenting magazine, either online or in print!

Summer camp is often a place to send elementary-age kids so they aren’t sitting around the house bored and so they’ll make friends and learn new things while having fun. As kids grow out of their “little kid years” we sometimes forget that they still need those kinds of experiences they had when they were younger, just in a different form. Maybe you don’t think your teen needs summer camp. Your teen should be babysitting, mowing lawns, working at the pool, hanging around with friends, right? Well, sure! But why not send them off for a week or more of summer fun and learning this year for a break? Here are some great benefits of teens attending summer camp:

1.      Learning how to give back. Community service camps offer a great chance for your teen to make a difference and help out in the community while also learning skills that will carry them through their life. Kids get to spend their days helping others, which just feels good to everyone involved. Maybe your teen will learn how to pack food for the homeless, teach kids how to read or work on a project that will benefit the community like cleaning up a playground or fixing equipment. They could even learn how to paint a house, care for a yard for an elderly person who is unable to do so anymore … or they may even learn how to plan and build a house for someone who is need.

2.      Kerrie McLoughlin is the seasoned homeschooling mom of 5. Her oldest teen has attended camp and wants to try new ones! Find them at TheKerrieShow.com.